Hollywood & Dogs

Uggie from the wonderful 2011 Black & White, silent movie The Artist died early August. This was very sad news indeed, but it made me want to have another look at some old pictures of Hollywood stars and their dogs from as early as 1916 to the 20s, 30s and up to the 60’s. I have, on one of my shelves at home, a wonderful book called Hollywood Dogs; here are a few snap shots and captions from it. It’s a beautiful book, and a great Christmas Present for dog lovers, or even just for yourself. (Yes, 18 Fridays till Christmas folks)

Theda Bara

1916

 
 Theda Bara (1916) The archetypical theatrical vamp that Theda Bara portrayed on screen was an entire fiction, dreamt up by her studio Fox films (later 20th century Fox) to promote her first film in 1915. The publicity stunt of presenting her as an Egyptian femme fatale, born in the shadow of the sphinx, was a great success, and her career peaked in 1917 with the million-dollar epic  CLEOPATRA . She is seen here in 1916, with her Regal Borzoi, Belva.

Theda Bara (1916) The archetypical theatrical vamp that Theda Bara portrayed on screen was an entire fiction, dreamt up by her studio Fox films (later 20th century Fox) to promote her first film in 1915. The publicity stunt of presenting her as an Egyptian femme fatale, born in the shadow of the sphinx, was a great success, and her career peaked in 1917 with the million-dollar epic CLEOPATRA. She is seen here in 1916, with her Regal Borzoi, Belva.

 

Charlie Chaplin

1918

 
 Charlie Chaplin (1918)  A DOG’S LIFE  was promoted as Chaplin’s “first million dollar picture” and presented as a major milestone in his career. It co-starred Scraps (played by a mixed-breed dog called Mutt) as his loyal companion. In one memorable scene Chaplin tried to take Scraps to a dance hall but finds that dogs are dog allowed inside, so he puts the dog down the back of his trousers. Of course there is a hole in his backside of the trousers, and when Chaplin bends down to tie his shoelaces, the dog’s tail pokes through and thumps a rhythmic beat on the bass drum, much to the bemusement of the old drummer in the dance band who cannot quite believe what he has just seen.

Charlie Chaplin (1918) A DOG’S LIFE was promoted as Chaplin’s “first million dollar picture” and presented as a major milestone in his career. It co-starred Scraps (played by a mixed-breed dog called Mutt) as his loyal companion. In one memorable scene Chaplin tried to take Scraps to a dance hall but finds that dogs are dog allowed inside, so he puts the dog down the back of his trousers. Of course there is a hole in his backside of the trousers, and when Chaplin bends down to tie his shoelaces, the dog’s tail pokes through and thumps a rhythmic beat on the bass drum, much to the bemusement of the old drummer in the dance band who cannot quite believe what he has just seen.

 

Buster Keaton

1930

 
 Buster Keaton (1930) The Studio system at MGM (and every other major film studio) ensured that every aspect of the film making process remained within their control – including the private lives of their film stars. Unsurprisingly this was unpopular with most of them, and when Buster Keaton was forced to rent a bungalow on the MGM lot in 1929 he promptly hung a sign outside which said “KEATON’S KENEL”. He told his bosses it was in honour of his Saint Bernard, Elmer, but it soon became known as an anti-establishment watering hole. Elmer fared rather better, and was often taken for long walks by Greta Garbo.

Buster Keaton (1930) The Studio system at MGM (and every other major film studio) ensured that every aspect of the film making process remained within their control – including the private lives of their film stars. Unsurprisingly this was unpopular with most of them, and when Buster Keaton was forced to rent a bungalow on the MGM lot in 1929 he promptly hung a sign outside which said “KEATON’S KENEL”. He told his bosses it was in honour of his Saint Bernard, Elmer, but it soon became known as an anti-establishment watering hole. Elmer fared rather better, and was often taken for long walks by Greta Garbo.

 

Flash

1934

 Flash (1934) the MGM dog (a Hollywood star in his own rights) With the box office magic generated at warner Bothers by Rin Tin Tin, other film studios were keen to find their own lucrative dog heroes. Flash was a German Shepherd, who appeared as a puppy in  HIS MASTER’S VOICE  in 1925, followed by another eight films for MGM, before honourably retiring in 1938.

Flash (1934) the MGM dog (a Hollywood star in his own rights) With the box office magic generated at warner Bothers by Rin Tin Tin, other film studios were keen to find their own lucrative dog heroes. Flash was a German Shepherd, who appeared as a puppy in HIS MASTER’S VOICE in 1925, followed by another eight films for MGM, before honourably retiring in 1938.

Clark Gable

1936

 
 Clark Gable (1936) Pictured here at the wheel of his car with an English Setter, Gable kept a number of old English and Irish setters such as Queens, an Irish Setter and the prize-winning Lord Reily of Redwood. His springer Spaniel Cameo’s Red Rocket was a champion in the 1950s. Photographed by Clarence Sinclair Bull.

Clark Gable (1936) Pictured here at the wheel of his car with an English Setter, Gable kept a number of old English and Irish setters such as Queens, an Irish Setter and the prize-winning Lord Reily of Redwood. His springer Spaniel Cameo’s Red Rocket was a champion in the 1950s. Photographed by Clarence Sinclair Bull.

 

Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall

1946

 
 Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall (1946) The Boxer was a wedding present to Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, from Pulitzer-prize winning writer Louis Bromfeld, “Harvey was really smart” Bacall later recalled, “he knew he wasn’t allowed to get on the furniture so he would only put two paws on at a time, and he would sit between us if we had a fight.” Photographed by Scotty Welbourne

Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall (1946) The Boxer was a wedding present to Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, from Pulitzer-prize winning writer Louis Bromfeld, “Harvey was really smart” Bacall later recalled, “he knew he wasn’t allowed to get on the furniture so he would only put two paws on at a time, and he would sit between us if we had a fight.” Photographed by Scotty Welbourne

 

Gregory Peck

1949

 
 My favourite picture of the book. Gregory Peck (1949) He may have been one of the greatest leading men of his day, but at home in Pacific Palisades it was his German Shepherd Slip who was the star of the show when she gave birth to thirteen puppies. Peck was making  THE GUN FIGHTER  at the time, but rush home to assist with all the drama.

My favourite picture of the book.
Gregory Peck (1949) He may have been one of the greatest leading men of his day, but at home in Pacific Palisades it was his German Shepherd Slip who was the star of the show when she gave birth to thirteen puppies. Peck was making THE GUN FIGHTER at the time, but rush home to assist with all the drama.

 

Grace Kelly

1956

 
 Grace Kelly (1956) and her Weimaraner, a wedding present from her brother jack, and given to her before she left America to marry Prince Rainier of Monaco in 1956.

Grace Kelly (1956) and her Weimaraner, a wedding present from her brother jack, and given to her before she left America to marry Prince Rainier of Monaco in 1956.

 

Marilyn Monroe

1961

 
 Marilyn Monroe (1961) Although she sometimes referred to him as a Poodle, Monroe’s last dog Maf was in fact a Maltese, given to her by Frank Sinatra in 1961. She rather wickedly named the dog mafia, which was soon shortened to Maf.

Marilyn Monroe (1961) Although she sometimes referred to him as a Poodle, Monroe’s last dog Maf was in fact a Maltese, given to her by Frank Sinatra in 1961. She rather wickedly named the dog mafia, which was soon shortened to Maf.

 

Rock Hudson

1965

 
 Rock Hudson (1965) “A devoted dog lover, Rock Hudson owned 7 dogs of different breeds including Demi Tasse (Haf Cup) The Poodle and an Irish Setter named Tucker. He is seen here with his Schnauzer Murphy in a picture taken during the filming of  STRANGE BEDFELLOWS  in 1965.”

Rock Hudson (1965) “A devoted dog lover, Rock Hudson owned 7 dogs of different breeds including Demi Tasse (Haf Cup) The Poodle and an Irish Setter named Tucker. He is seen here with his Schnauzer Murphy in a picture taken during the filming of STRANGE BEDFELLOWS in 1965.”

 

 
Hollywood Dogs: Photographs from the John Kobal Foundation
£22.95
By Gareth Abbott, Catherine Britton, Introduction by William Secord
 

All images copyrighted by their respective owners.

Source: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hollywood-Dogs-Pho...